WWW.ABSTRACT.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Abstract, dissertation, book
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 |

«Part One TheoreTical PersPecTives on values, religion, and adolescenT develoPmenT in culTural conTexT © in this web service Cambridge University ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

Cambridge University Press

978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development

Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen

Excerpt

More information

Part One

TheoreTical PersPecTives on values,

religion, and adolescenT develoPmenT

in culTural conTexT

© in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org

Cambridge University Press

978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development

Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen Excerpt More information © in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen Excerpt More information Cultural Perspectives on Values and Religion in Adolescent Development a conceptual overview and synthesis gisela Trommsdorff Abstract This chapter discusses why research on adolescent development will benefit from a focus on values and religion using a culture-sensitive approach. In the first part, the relations among culture, values, and religion in adolescent development are briefly summarized. The second part deals with the topic of adolescent values, and the third part addresses religion and religiosity.

Each part discusses relevant research from a multidisciplinary perspective and highlights major issues, results, and gaps in sociological and psychological research. Finally, the theoretical and empirical contributions of this volume are discussed, and suggestions are made for future research in order to achieve a better understanding of adolescent development in a changing cultural context.

Can a cultural perspective on adolescent values and religion contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of adolescent development?

Adolescents experience major biological, psychological, and social transitions that may be characterized as relatively universal developmental challenges (Graber & Brooks-Gunn, 1996). However, research has primarily focused on European-American adolescents, disregarding the cultural context of development. This is surprising given that Bronfenbrenner (1979) introduced an ecological perspective into developmental psychology more than three decades ago. Even globalization and growing awareness of the cultural and socioeconomic diversity of adolescent environments have rarely resulted in empirical research (Steinberg & Morris, 2001).

Only recently were some culture-informed edited volumes (e.g., Arnett, 2012; Brown, Larson, & Saraswathi, 2002) and theoretically based culturesensitive reviews (Arnett, 2011) on adolescent development published.

© in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen Excerpt More information

–  –  –

What can a culture-sensitive approach to adolescent development contribute? First, it may help clarify questions about how values and religion impact adolescent development. Values and religion are assumed to be important in adolescent development as part of the formation of a meaningful view of the self and the world (Rothbaum & Wang, 2010;

Trommsdorff, 2012). The construction of self- and world-views is often motivated by identity development, one of the main developmental tasks in adolescence (Erikson, 1968). Identity has been seen as providing a sense of coherence and continuity in one’s life, thereby reducing uncertainty and confusion in understanding oneself, one’s relation to others, and the world.

However, it is not clear which factors contribute to the processes and outcomes of identity development. For example, an extension of the social and cultural boundaries and contexts because of an increasing globalization has given rise to multiple choices in identity development (Azmitia, Syed, & Radmacher, 2008).

The present volume attempts to clarify the role of culture, values, and religion as the assumed major factors in adolescent development. These factors are seen here as part of interrelated meaning systems influencing self- and world-views. They are also seen as part of social institutions and personal (e.g., peer, parent–child) relationships representing distant and proximal contexts for adolescents’ development. A number of open issues have to be dealt with to achieve a better understanding of how adolescent development is related to the cultural context, values, and religion, and how these affect the development of adolescents’ self- and world-views, goals, behavior, everyday practices, and social adjustment.

In this overview, I begin with a brief outline of the main issues in past research on adolescent development in cultural context. This is followed by sections on values and youth and on religion and youth, both from a culture-informed perspective. These two sections note open questions from past research and highlight insights from this volume regarding the interrelations of culture, values, and religion in adolescent development. As a whole, this volume is organized around four major issues in research on adolescent development, each of which is affected by the multiple interrelations of culture, values, and religion: (1) theoretical perspectives, (2) universal and culture-specific functions of values and religion in adolescent development, (3) adolescent adjustment in times of social change, and (4) socialization processes of values and religion in adolescent development.





© in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen Excerpt More information

–  –  –

Culture, Values, and Religion in Adolescent Development What do we know about adolescent development cross-culturally in a globalizing world where different values and religions prevail?

Developmental science assumes basic processes of development ranging from biological, psychological, and social functions to societal, ecological, cultural, and historical levels (e.g., Lerner, Lewin-Bizan, & Warren, 2011).

Adolescent development is a period in the lifespan that includes systematic successive changes in the person, based on changes at the biological, psychological, social, and cultural levels, with nature and nurture interacting in the dynamics of development. The dynamic systems approach to adolescent development (Kunnen, 2012) attempts to provide explanations for stability and change based on nonlinear interaction processes. Normative and history-graded factors are especially relevant in adolescence and early adulthood (Baltes & Brim, 1980). These factors are regarded here as part of individual-context relations, assuming that their influence is modified by cultural phenomena and individual agency in development. This assumption has recently stimulated some culture-informed research (see Arnett, 2006, 2011, 2012; Brown et al., 2002), but many questions still remain unanswered. Therefore, a main purpose of this volume is to clarify whether and in which aspects adolescent development is similar or different in varying parts of the world, and what role values and religion play in adolescent development in different cultural contexts.

Our interest in cultural perspectives on values and religion in adolescent development is informed by ecological theorizing (Bronfenbrenner, 1979), questions regarding interactions between person and context (“goodness of fit”), and the assumption of adolescents as agents of their development. From an ecological perspective, values and religion constitute developmental contexts where family, peers, and school play important roles in adolescents’ socialization in the respective culture. The goal of the culture-informed ecological approach is to take into account cross-cultural and intracultural differences in adolescent development while also analyzing universal processes. However, research to date has largely neglected the role of culture with respect to the function of values and religion in adolescent development. Therefore, the purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the relevant literature, note unanswered questions, and describe the contributions of chapters in this volume, all of which highlight the importance of cultural variables for values and religion in adolescents’ development.

Cultural variables have been related to various macrolevel variables such as aspects of socioeconomic status (e.g., economic growth, educational level, © in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen Excerpt More information

–  –  –

urbanization, etc.), and to the individual-level variables of value orientation and religiosity. Both levels of cultural variables are relevant for developmental processes and outcomes. “Culture” has been conceptualized in different ways in past research. Sociologists have described culture with collective and individual representations (Durkheim, 1981) or as “norm-cycles” in line with an “objective” culture (Elder-Vass, 2010). Anthropologists have described cultures with respect to rituals, myths, symbols (Jahoda, 2007), cultural practices (Cole & Packer, 2011), or “Gemeinschaft”–“Gesellschaft” (Greenfield, 2010). Psychologists have used the concepts of cultural dimensions (e.g., individualism, collectivism; Hofstede, 1980; Triandis, 1995), tight and loose cultures (Gelfand et al., 2011), shared meaning systems (Bruner, 1990), cultural tasks (Kitayama & Imada, 2010), or cultural models of agency (e.g., independence, interdependence) describing how specific beliefs, values, and practices vary across nations (Markus & Kitayama, 1991). Here, I perceive culture as a complex, major developmental context offering specific cultural models of agency, which imply certain self- and world-views (Rothbaum & Wang, 2010; Trommsdorff, 2012). These cultural models of agency influence further developmental contexts on different levels of socialization, such as at the macrolevel of economic, educational, and religious institutions and the microlevel of the family.

Developmental contexts can undergo processes of historical and social change. Adolescents in many parts of the world experience sociopolitical, economic, and cultural changes that have an impact on their lives (e.g., regarding family, employment, technology, mobility, health). Several reviews on adolescent development have shown that the experience of transitions and changes does not necessarily result in problematic or difficult development (e.g., Coleman, 2011; Steinberg, 1999). Empirical research has dealt with questions of whether certain political and socioeconomic changes include risks and chances and how these impact adolescent development (e.g., Chen, 2012; Chen & French, 2008; Elder & Shanahan, 2006;

Kagitcibasi, 2006, 2007; Trommsdorff, 2009b). However, several questions remain, some of which are dealt with in this volume by focusing on different cultures, values, and religious orientations. For example, issues during times of social change are examined by discussing the impact of values for adjustment (see Norasakkunkit & Uchida, Chapter 9 in this volume, for Japanese youth; Chen, Wang, & Liu, Chapter 10 in this volume, for Chinese youth).

An important aspect of adolescents’ development is related to values in the cultural context. Adolescents undergo processes of identity development that reflect on cultural and individual values and beliefs as part of one’s relation to the world. During this developmental period of constructing © in this web service Cambridge University Press www.cambridge.org Cambridge University Press 978-1-107-01425-1 - Values, Religion, and Culture in Adolescent Development Edited by Gisela Trommsdorff and Xinyin Chen Excerpt More information

–  –  –

self- and world-views (see Kornadt, Chapter 2 in this volume; Rothbaum, Wang, & Cohen, Chapter 3 in this volume), adolescents are determining which values to adopt to guide their own individual development, including goal setting, decision making, and behavior (e.g., Alsaker & Kroger, 2006). Because there is little research on the role of cultural factors in the development of values, related questions – including questions of cultural fit (as a condition for positive development) and processes in the socialization and transmission of values among peers or from parents to their adolescent children – are addressed in all sections of this volume.

Assuming that the development of adolescents’ values is related to more general cultural value orientations, questions also arise as to whether and in which way values are related to religion and individual religiosity, and whether religion and religiosity have a specific function in adolescent development. In past research, the relations between values and religion have seldom been studied systematically. Researchers have usually investigated values and religion in relative isolation. Exceptions are Rokeach (1969) and a meta-analysis by Saroglou, Delpierre, and Dernelle (2004).

Past neglect of this issue may be owing to a relative lack of psychological research on the role of religiosity and religion in adolescent development (Roelkepartain, King, Wagener, & Benson, 2005). Recently, questions that have been of specific interest include whether the often-assumed increase in secularization, the rise of religious fundamentalism, and the development of new forms of spirituality are relevant to positive youth development (King & Roeser, 2009). For a fruitful study of these questions, researchers must take into account both cultural variables and the effect these variables may have on adolescents’ developmental pathways.



Pages:   || 2 |


Similar works:

«Publications by Thomas H. Nash III, 1971 to 2010 Dissertation NASH III, T.H. (1971): Effect of Effluents from a Zinc Factory on Lichens. – Ph.D. Dissertation. Rutgers, New Brunswick. Books, Specialized Publications, and Technical Reports NASH III, T.H. & WIRTH, V. (eds.) (1988): Lichens, Bryophytes and Air Quality. – Bibliotheca Lichenologica 30: 1–298. NASH III, T.H., GRIES, C. & ELIX, J.A. (1995): A Revision of the Lichen Genus Xanthoparmelia in South America. – Bibliotheca...»

«Disentangling the mechanisms and uncovering the scale of increasing liana size and abundance in neotropical forests By David C. Marvin A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) in the University of Michigan Doctoral Committee: Associate Professor Robyn J. Burnham, Chair Associate Professor Christopher W. Dick Assistant Professor Inés Ibáñez Associate Research Scientist Kathleen M. Bergen ©...»

«Targeting neuronal populations by AAV-mediated gene transfer for studying the endocannabinoid system Dissertation zur Erlangung des Grades “Doktor der Naturwissenschaften” am Fachbereich Biologie der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität in Mainz Stephan Guggenhuber geboren am 22.10.1980 in München Mainz, 2013 Dekan: 1. Berichterstattung:2. Berichterstattung: Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: 18.06.2013 Table of contents Table of contents 1 SUMMARY / ZUSAMMENFASSUNG 1.1 Summary 1.2 Zusammenfassung 2...»

«© Biologiezentrum Linz/Austria; download unter www.biologiezentrum.at Linzer biol. Beitr. 46/1 665-673 31.7.2014 A contribution to the knowledge of the Mantodea (Insecta) fauna of Iran H. GHAHARI & M.G. El-Den NASSER A b s t r a c t : This paper deals with the fauna of some species of Mantodea from different regions of Iran. In total 17 species from 11 genera (including Amorphoscelis STÅL, Blepharopsis REHN, Empusa COHN, Eremiaphila LEFÈBVRE, Ameles BURMEISTER, Armene STÅL, Bolivaria STÅL,...»

«Role of outgrowth endothelial cells for applications in Tissue Engineering Dissertation zur Erlangung des Grades Doktor der Naturwissenschaften am Fachbereich Biologie der Johannes Gutenberg-Universität in Mainz Eva Dohle geb. am 21.09.1979 in Wickede-Wimbern Mainz, Februar 2011 Dekan: 1. Berichterstatter:2. Berichterstatter:Tag der mündlichen Prüfung: ii Danksagung iii Abbrevations Abbrevations ALP Alkaline phosphatase Ang1 Angiopoietin1 Ang2 Angiopoietin2 APS Ammonium persulfate BCA...»

«Исаева Валерия Васильевна профессор, главный научный сотрудник лаборатории эмбриологии Института биологии моря ДВО РАН CURRICULUM VITAE Name: Isaeva Valeria Vasilyevna Birth date: October 16, 1939 Birth place: Leningrad Education: Leningrad State University, 1962 (zoology) Area of scientific interest: developmental and cell biology, biological self-organization Degrees: PhD, Leningrad State...»

«C-DI-GMP Signaltransduktion in der Regulation der Expression des Biofilmregulators CsgD in Escherichia coli Dissertation zur Erlangung des akademischen Grades des Doktors der Naturwissenschaften (Dr. rer. nat.) eingereicht im Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie der Freien Universit¨ Berlin at vorgelegt von Sandra Lindenberg aus Berlin Diese Arbeit entstand in der Zeit zwischen April 2009 und Juli 2013 in der Arbeitsgruppe von Prof. Dr. Regine Hengge an der Freien Universität Berlin....»

«DISSERTATION Titel der Dissertation Individual differences in behaviour and cognitive performance in domestic dogs Verfasserin Mag. Stefanie Riemer BSc. angestrebter akademischer Grad Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Wien, 2014 Studienkennzahl lt. A 094 437 Studienblatt: Dissertationsgebiet lt. Biologie Studienblatt: Betreuerin / Betreuer: Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Ludwig Huber “Courage and timidity are extremely variable qualities in the individuals of the same species, as is plainly seen in our dogs....»

«Amplitude modulation phase and speech rhythm A role for amplitude modulation phase relationships in speech rhythm perception Victoria Leong1,a), Michael A. Stone2, Richard E. Turner3, and Usha Goswami1 Centre for Neuroscience in Education, Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB,United Kingdom Auditory Perception Group, Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB,United Kingdom Computational and Biological...»

«Friday, April 17, 2015 C/D Atrium Main Campus Stockton University Organizers: Dr. Matthew F. Bonnan and Dr. Tara Harmer Luke, Biology NAMS Dean: Dr. Dennis Weiss 2015 NAMS Research Symposium, Abstracts of Posters 1 Posters by Number (#) – the number corresponds to where the poster will be displayed in C/D Atrium Faculty sponsors are indicated in bold. # Authors Program(s) Title 1 Anderson, Cooper, Mohammed Biology Identification and Characterization of Reza, Louay Zumot, Thai Tran, Aquifer...»

«ABSTRACT Title of Dissertation: NOVEL APPROACHES TO STUDYING BIODIVERSITY IN REMOTE AREAS: DISTRIBUTION OF LICHENS AND PENGUINS ACROSS THE ANTARCTIC PENINSULA. Paula Victoria Casanovas, Doctor of Philosophy 2013 Directed By: Dr. William F. Fagan, Department of Biology, University of Maryland and Dr. Heather J. Lynch, Department of Ecology & Evolution, Stony Brook University Biodiversity inventories are a critical resource, providing baseline information for assessing environmental changes over...»

«©Akademie d. Wissenschaften Wien; download unter www.biologiezentrum.at Das Eindringen eines pflanzenfressenden Marienkäfers (Epilachna argus G e o f f r. 1) in das Wiener Becken V on w. M. W il h e l m K ü h n e l t, W ien (Vorgelegt in der Sitzung der mathem.-naturw. Klasse am 15. Oktober 1981) Am 4. Mai 1978 fand ich auf einer, vor m ehreren Jahren in m einem G arten (W ien XV, G oldschlagstraße 120) eingesetzten Z aunrübe (Bryonia dioica) zehn Im agines von Epilachna argus, davon zw...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.abstract.xlibx.info - Free e-library - Abstract, dissertation, book

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.